Notebook

Toleration Deluxe by Nihad Nino Pušija

December 3, 2012 at 8:35 pm / by
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010

Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010

Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010

Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010

Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010

Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010 thumbnail
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010 thumbnail
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010 thumbnail
Nihad Nino Pušija, Duldung Deluxe, 2010 thumbnail

Duldung Deluxe (Toleration Deluxe) is a photographic research and publication project by the Berlin-based, Bosnian artist Nihad Nino Pušija. It explores living conditions under which Roma youth from Bosnia, Kosovo and Serbia exist in Germany today. Pušija’s subjects, like himself, came from the states of former Yugoslavia in the 1990s seeking refuge from war. They arrived in Germany under the status of “toleration.” Many came here as children and have lived continually with the threat of deportation or have already been deported. That is the case with two Kosovan brothers who grew up in Essen. After more than 20 years in Germany, they were forced in 2010 to return to Kosovo without contacts or a place to stay and in a country whose language they do not speak.

In 2009 the possibility of Roma achieving residency status in Germany became less likely when the Kosovan government decided it would reintegrate 5,000 repatriates every year. According to the curator Lith Bahlmann, “Despite continual and vehement warnings from human rights organizations, the German government too will deport up to 14,000 refugees, including around 10,000 Roman, to the successor state of the former Yugoslavia.” Violence against Roma continues and the Kosovo state is unable to provide adequate protection.

The publication Toleration Deluxe takes the form of a passport. It has an official-looking design, green watermarked interior pages with simulated perforations and maroon vinyl cover embossed with gold letters. Within the form of this highly desirable German document are photographs and accounts of individuals whose lives are shaped by a residency status that certifies deportation is only temporarily waved. This status does not have benefits of citizenship and thus puts on hold the prospects of building and sustaining a life anywhere.

The project was supported by Allianz Cultural Foundation and first shown at the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR) in Berlin in 2010. It was also exhibited last winter in Reconsidering Roma. Aspects of Roma and Sinti Life in Contemporary Art at Kunstraum Kreuzberg. The publication is available at NGBK in Berlin.

 

0 Comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment

 

— required *

— required *